Judith Butler Fletcher

American Philosopher/Amateur Sleuth

56,239 notes

tarragonable:

fuckyeahsexeducation:

fckdiamondsigotspinach:

exgynocraticgrrl:

Porn Actress Exposes Industry: Trafficking in the Porn Industry - The Pink Cross

Elements of Sex Trafficking

Act: Recruitment, transportation, transfer, harbouring or receipt of persons;

Means: Threat or use of force, coercion, abduction, fraud, deception, abuse of power or vulnerability, or giving payments or benefits to a person in control of the victim;

Purpose: Prostitution of others, sexual exploitation, forced labor or services, or slavery.

- From the 2000 UN Protocol to Prevent, Suppress and Punish Trafficking in Persons, Especially Women and Children, ratified by 154 countries. (x)

[Highlighted elements of sex trafficking in the porn industry connect with the examples Lubben gives in this specific gifset, other elements do occur in the porn industry as well].

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"The federal Trafficking Victims Protection Act defines the crime of human trafficking as:

A. The recruitment, harboring, transportation, provision, or obtaining of a person for the purpose of a commercial sex act where such an act is induced by force, fraud, or coercion, or in which the person induced to perform such act has not attained 18 years of age, or

B. The recruitment, harboring, transportation, provision, or obtaining of a person for labor or services, through the use of force, fraud, or coercion for the purpose of subjection to involuntary servitude, peonage, debt bondage, or slavery.” - (x)

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… [P]ersons are trafficked into the international sex trade, often by force, fraud, or coercion. The sex industry has rapidly expanded over the past several decades. It involves sexual exploitation of persons, predominantly women and girls, involving activities related to prostitution, pornography, sex tourism, and other commercial sexual services. The low status of women in many parts of the world has contributed to a burgeoning of the trafficking industry. -
The Victims of Trafficking and Violence Prevention Act (TVPA). TVPA combats trafficking in persons, especially into the sex trade, slavery, and involuntary servitude. It has been reauthorized three times since its initial passage: (x)

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THAT IS RAPE

We need to be talking about this and we need to be making sex work safe. No one should be made to feel like this treatment is okay.

This needs to be seen and people need to speak out about it.

(via creepysleepyqueer)

21,019 notes

Teachers are often unaware of the gender distribution of talk in their classrooms. They usually consider that they give equal amounts of attention to girls and boys, and it is only when they make a tape recording that they realize that boys are dominating the interactions. Dale Spender, an Australian feminist who has been a strong advocate of female rights in this area, noted that teachers who tried to restore the balance by deliberately ‘favouring’ the girls were astounded to find that despite their efforts they continued to devote more time to the boys in their classrooms. Another study reported that a male science teacher who managed to create an atmosphere in which girls and boys contributed more equally to discussion felt that he was devoting 90 per cent of his attention to the girls. And so did his male pupils. They complained vociferously that the girls were getting too much talking time.

In other public contexts, too, such as seminars and debates, when women and men are deliberately given an equal amount of the highly valued talking time, there is often a perception that they are getting more than their fair share. Dale Spender explains this as follows:

“The talkativeness of women has been gauged in comparison not with men but with silence. Women have not been judged on the grounds of whether they talk more than men, but of whether they talk more than silent women.”

In other words, if women talk at all, this may be perceived as ‘too much’ by men who expect them to provide a silent, decorative background in many social contexts.

PBS: Language as Prejudice - Myth #6: Women Talk Too Much (via misandry-mermaid)

Every EVERY women’s studies class I’ve been in has had this problem and failed to address it. 

(via iamayoungfeminist)

(via creepysleepyqueer)

4 notes

dg2msw:

So - Dennis Stanton. Love him? Hate him? My husband’s opinion is that - in this role, at least - Keith Mitchell “can’t act his way out of a paper bag.” I guess he falls into the “hate him” camp. What do y’all think?

Honestly, hate him. I agree he can’t act his way out of a paper bag and the bar wasn’t set too high on this show. I skip all his episodes, not worth it. I’m more of a Harry McGraw fan, myself.

dg2msw:

So - Dennis Stanton. Love him? Hate him? My husband’s opinion is that - in this role, at least - Keith Mitchell “can’t act his way out of a paper bag.” I guess he falls into the “hate him” camp. What do y’all think?

Honestly, hate him. I agree he can’t act his way out of a paper bag and the bar wasn’t set too high on this show. I skip all his episodes, not worth it.

I’m more of a Harry McGraw fan, myself.

Filed under murder she wrote msw jerry orbach

2,531 notes


After years of stock characters, [Viola] was thrilled to play a real protagonist, a fully developed, conflicted, somewhat mysterious woman. “It’s what I’ve had my eye on for so long,” she said. “It’s time for people to see us, people of color, for what we really are: complicated.” | x |

After years of stock characters, [Viola] was thrilled to play a real protagonist, a fully developed, conflicted, somewhat mysterious woman. “It’s what I’ve had my eye on for so long,” she said. “It’s time for people to see us, people of color, for what we really are: complicated.” | x |

(Source: fyeahblackactresses, via saturnoregresa)