Judith Butler Fletcher

American Philosopher/Amateur Sleuth

16,965 notes

Teachers are often unaware of the gender distribution of talk in their classrooms. They usually consider that they give equal amounts of attention to girls and boys, and it is only when they make a tape recording that they realize that boys are dominating the interactions. Dale Spender, an Australian feminist who has been a strong advocate of female rights in this area, noted that teachers who tried to restore the balance by deliberately ‘favouring’ the girls were astounded to find that despite their efforts they continued to devote more time to the boys in their classrooms. Another study reported that a male science teacher who managed to create an atmosphere in which girls and boys contributed more equally to discussion felt that he was devoting 90 per cent of his attention to the girls. And so did his male pupils. They complained vociferously that the girls were getting too much talking time.

In other public contexts, too, such as seminars and debates, when women and men are deliberately given an equal amount of the highly valued talking time, there is often a perception that they are getting more than their fair share. Dale Spender explains this as follows:

“The talkativeness of women has been gauged in comparison not with men but with silence. Women have not been judged on the grounds of whether they talk more than men, but of whether they talk more than silent women.”

In other words, if women talk at all, this may be perceived as ‘too much’ by men who expect them to provide a silent, decorative background in many social contexts.

PBS: Language as Prejudice - Myth #6: Women Talk Too Much (via misandry-mermaid)

Every EVERY women’s studies class I’ve been in has had this problem and failed to address it. 

(via iamayoungfeminist)

(via creepysleepyqueer)

4 notes

dg2msw:

So - Dennis Stanton. Love him? Hate him? My husband’s opinion is that - in this role, at least - Keith Mitchell “can’t act his way out of a paper bag.” I guess he falls into the “hate him” camp. What do y’all think?

Honestly, hate him. I agree he can’t act his way out of a paper bag and the bar wasn’t set too high on this show. I skip all his episodes, not worth it. I’m more of a Harry McGraw fan, myself.

dg2msw:

So - Dennis Stanton. Love him? Hate him? My husband’s opinion is that - in this role, at least - Keith Mitchell “can’t act his way out of a paper bag.” I guess he falls into the “hate him” camp. What do y’all think?

Honestly, hate him. I agree he can’t act his way out of a paper bag and the bar wasn’t set too high on this show. I skip all his episodes, not worth it.

I’m more of a Harry McGraw fan, myself.

Filed under murder she wrote msw jerry orbach

2,110 notes


After years of stock characters, [Viola] was thrilled to play a real protagonist, a fully developed, conflicted, somewhat mysterious woman. “It’s what I’ve had my eye on for so long,” she said. “It’s time for people to see us, people of color, for what we really are: complicated.” | x |

After years of stock characters, [Viola] was thrilled to play a real protagonist, a fully developed, conflicted, somewhat mysterious woman. “It’s what I’ve had my eye on for so long,” she said. “It’s time for people to see us, people of color, for what we really are: complicated.” | x |

(Source: fyeahblackactresses, via saturnoregresa)

104,293 notes

Ancient moon priestesses were called virgins. ‘Virgin’ meant not married, not belonging to a man - a woman who was ‘one-in-herself’. The very word derives from a Latin root meaning strength, force, skill; and was later applied to men: virile. Ishtar, Diana, Astarte, Isis were all all called virgin, which did not refer to sexual chastity, but sexual independence. And all great culture heroes of the past, mythic or historic, were said to be born of virgin mothers: Marduk, Gilgamesh, Buddha, Osiris, Dionysus, Genghis Khan, Jesus - they were all affirmed as sons of the Great Mother, of the Original One, their worldly power deriving from her. When the Hebrews used the word, and in the original Aramaic, it meant ‘maiden’ or ‘young woman’, with no connotations to sexual chastity. But later Christian translators could not conceive of the ‘Virgin Mary’ as a woman of independent sexuality, needless to say; they distorted the meaning into sexually pure, chaste, never touched.

Monica Sjoo, The Great Cosmic Mother: Rediscovering the Religion of the Earth  (via thewaking)

Literally the most important thing you will read today.

(via aesrettibeht)

#staywoke

(via diokpara)

naturally, ‘virile’ retains its original meaning

(via ermengarde)

(Source: ynannarising, via saturnoregresa)

27,478 notes

cisyphus:

Slurs are not oppressive because they are offensive, they are oppressive  because slurs by nature of being slurs draw upon certain power dynamics  to remind their target of his/her/their vulnerability in a certain relation to power and as an extension of that, to threaten violence and exploitation of that vulnerability.

(via genderqueerd)